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Greenhouse and Nursery in Bedford

If you’re a beginning gardener, you may be wondering how you can help your flowers and plants stay healthy and vigorous. One way to do this is by deadheading, which involves removing spent blooms or foliage. Doing this not only helps your plants look their best, but can also encourage new growth. If you’re not sure how to deadhead properly, never fear – take a look at this guide to deadheading flowers and plants in your garden from New England Nurseries in Bedford.

What Is Deadheading?

Deadheading is the process of removing spent blooms or foliage from flowers and plants. This can be done by simply snapping off the bloom at the stem, or cutting it back to a leaf node (the point where leaves are attached to the stem). Deadheading not only helps your plants look neater, but can also encourage new growth.

Why Do I Need to Deadhead Flowers?

There are a few reasons why you might want to deadhead your flowers. For one, it can help them to look their best – removing spent blooms will give the plant a neater appearance. Additionally, deadheading can encourage new growth, as the plant will put its energy into producing new blooms rather than into producing seeds. Deadheading can also prevent the spread of diseases, as pathogens can often enter a plant through spent blooms.

Which Flowers Can You Deadhead?

Almost any flower can be deadheaded, but there are a few that benefit particularly from this practice. Annual flowers, such as impatiens and petunias, will often bloom more profusely if you deadhead them regularly. Perennials, such as daisies and coneflowers, can also be deadheaded to promote more growth.

How to Deadhead Flowers in Your Garden

Now that you know what deadheading is and why you should do it, you may be wondering how to go about it. Deadheading is a simple process, but there are a few things to keep in mind. First, make sure you have sharp pruning shears or scissors – this will make the job easier and prevent damage to the plant. Second, be sure to cut at an angle just above a leaf node – this will encourage new growth. Finally, be sure to add fertilizer after you’re done, as deadheading can be taxing on the plant.

How to Deadhead: Annuals vs. Perennials

Annual flowers, such as impatiens and petunias, will often bloom more profusely if you deadhead them regularly. You can deadhead them once or twice a week to create more blooms. Perennials, such as daisies and coneflowers, can also be deadheaded to ensure that your plants grow as many flowers as possible.

Plants You Should Deadhead

Some of the best plants to deadhead are:

  • Columbine
  • Garden cosmos
  • Geraniums
  • Lavender
  • Hollyhock
  • Rose campion
  • Larkspur
  • Daisies
  • Wild violets

Plants You Should Not Deadhead

While many plants can be deadheaded, there are some that should be left alone. They include:

  • Barrenwort
  • Joe-pye weed
  • Leopard plant
  • Peony
  • Goat’s beard

Contact Our Bedford Nursery Today

Still feel like deadheading plants or flowers is tedious? Give our team at New England Nurseries a call and we will be happy to do it for you. We can even recommend the best plants for your garden. Get in touch with us today!